Here I go again

I looked up my old posts to see if I already talked about psychoanalysts

And, sadly, I did. I forgot a lot and wish I could have  a new without the one that preexists.

If I’d known better I would have waited and have mentioned as well

Crazy Tracy from Ally McBeal’s first seasons, we can’t really say she’s swell!

And I’m not even going to mention the other Psychoanalysts we see in the show,

Be it the Bruce Willis special appearance and this other one who lasts until Ally brakes her toe.

There also was this movie about therapists’ patients in NYC deciding to analyze on their own

While every psychoanalyst has left the city for holidays like anyone could be analyzed alone.

Anyway what I mean is that psychoanalyst is one of the jobs it’s easy to talk about

Even when you don’t know anything about it, it’s so mysterious nobody would have a doubt:

It has to exist this way somewhere or somehow. I must say it’s something I bless.

I like that legends like this can exist, everybody loves fantasy in the US.


 

Sunday’s Review 24: What to expect when you’re expecting

What-to-expect-when-youre-expecting

I’m French, I’ve never been pregnant, nonetheless, for me, the ultimate reference for pregnancies is the book “What to expect when you’re expecting”. How come? Years and years of American movies and series watching did the trick. As any good reference, Hollywood took it and made a movie with it and, I must say, I was smitten.

Evidently, this movie is addressed to a particular audience. It aimed it, analyzed it, and served to it the proper content: perfect efficiency! It’s a product well sold. Let me elaborate: A movie centered on pregnancy and different ways to tackle it was not going to be an action movie, a brain film or an artistic realization. Of course it was going to be about feelings, day to day life, relationships and family. In a nutshell, it was going to enter the under-rated category “girly movie” and it did!

The funniest part was with how much confidence it entered into that category: starting with a dance scene, not forgetting the Dirty Dancing reference, having has much good looking guys as possible (Special thanks to the casting staff for Rodrigo Santoro…), they did it all!

I don’t think it isn’t necessary for me to tell you about the funny parts, the nice soundtrack maybe the lack of deepness… You got it, don’t you? It’s a nice movie for a rainy Sunday afternoon. If you’re an addict to this kind of film you will probably, as I did, fall for it, laugh loud, shed a tear, smile a lot and sigh of satisfaction in the end. If you are just a normal human being, you’ll probably have a good time, not admit it, and say in the end with a smile “it’s still a bit silly”.

Sunday’s Review 23: Pulp Fiction

Pulp-fiction

Last week-end, I had a chance to see Pulp Fiction on the theater (which I didn’t do when it was first released because I was 6 years old) and I stupidly didn’t take it. I really wish I had because my point of view on this movie is really conditioned by the way I discovered it.

I knew the Pulp Fiction soundtrack by heart way before I saw the film. I heard John Travolta ask “You know what they put on french fries instead of ketchup?” a hundred times when I only saw the movie once or twice. And, to add up to this bias, the first time I saw Pulp fiction was at one o’clock in the morning after a pretty bibulous evening. So, my point of views on it might not be as clear as asked for a regular movie reviewer.

Nonetheless, we all (or most of all) occasionally see movies after a party or discover a movie after hearing its soundtrack. So I guess I’m going to give an opinion from a normal person, not a reviewer who would be stepping as a judge to give a valuable opinion that anyone should accept as law.

Now, that I took three paragraphs to explain who is going to talk to you about Pulp Fiction, there is not so much room to actually do it but that’s ok. I only need to say three things:

First, Quentin Tarantino cinema is different. Like or not, it is not usual and it’s nice to change sometimes.

Secondly, John Travolta, Samuel Lee Jackson, Bruce Willis, Uma Thurman, Tim Roth and Amanda Plummer (Pumpkin and Honey Bunny) and even Ving Rhames (Marcellus) are all put at a place we don’t expect them to be and they rule at it.

Finally, Quentin Tarantino’s different cinema isn’t always a crowd pleaser, often for right reasons, but this one is The one you should see if you were to see only one of his films.

I’m not going to try to tell you what it is about, just watch it, you will have fun.

 

“I had a speech…”

I had a speech all prepared for you today

I was going to talk about society cliché

On the subject that we, young people, don’t know anything anymore,

Lost every education that mattered and maybe more.

All this ignorance supposedly caused entirely by internet, movies and television.

I was going to say that without all that, first, I wouldn’t be able to have this conversation.

I learned a large part of my English thanks to those brain-sucker evils.

Then, I was going to ask if they thought I would know why Jack and Jill went up on hills,

About Wilson’s disease or about Massachusetts concerns in sexual harassment laws,

If I didn’t spend so much time on those horrible mind-crushers making us cows.

But there was no point saying all this here, for the very one who live all day wireless.

But I had to have my one useless speech, everyone does at least one in the US.


 

Sunday’s Review 22: How to steal a million

Annex_-_hepburn_audrey_how_to_steal_a_million_16

 

Quirky and cute. Never mind the light plot and uncanny turns of events, Peter O’Toole astonishing blue eyes and Audrey Hepburn’s yogurt-sized red car do the trick: a good time in front of the big screen. I know we might want more from a movie but really, do we?

I haven’t been blown away but I laughed, I haven’t felt my heart torn in pieces with emotions but I was moved, I haven’t hold my breath on behalf of the suspense but I smiled at the funny stratagems. Does it have to be huge to get a 5 stars review? Maybe How to steal a million is kind of a St Ex’s Little Prince for cinema; perhaps with a little less wisdom.

Anyway, How to steal a million is a delightful Audrey Hepburn’s movie where her beauty and charms go perfectly along with Peter O’toole’s own beauty and charms. The burlesque French guards and witty Hugh Griffith (Hepburn’s dad in the film) add on to the pretty picture.

If you wonder what it’s about well it’s about a millionaire conman’s daughter who decides to steal a Venus statue from a museum when the very statue belongs to her. To do so, she asks the help of who she thinks is a gentleman burglar but who is really a detective specialized in art forgeries. He accepts for obvious reasons (Audrey Hepburn’s wide eyes and pretty figure) and thus begins a crazy heist for a supposedly one million worth art piece.

I’d like to state for the record that I do not like Every Movie. It’s just that I like to talk about the ones I did and, I admit, am able to have a really good time in front of not so brilliant movies. Anyway, for this one, you can go without fear, you’ll have a good time as well. If you don’t, I commit to find another movie that you will actually enjoy.

 

Hitchhicker’s guide to the sitcom galaxy

 

I often feel like TV sitcoms are all following a “how to make a good episode” guide.

I recently figured out they just follow the mentor of them all, which for all will provide.

I’m of course talking about Friends ten seasons’ wonder.

There are lots of sitcoms out there but it’s the same, only worse or better.

From the recurring catchphrases to the between friends relationships,

From the famous actors guest stars to the exotic trips,

From the stupid bets to the crazy parenting teams,

From the youth retro-vintage-quaint flashbacks to the weird dreams,

From the shocking secrets and revelations to the nice places to hangout,

They did it all and others just had to take the best out.

We all have something to learn from this bible of sitcom greatness.

I genuinely invite you to buy the Friends DVDs, everybody has them in the US.